Delegation for SIII for vet nurses

Delegation for SIII for vet nurses

I’ve somehow managed to have a few pieces on a similar theme out at once, excellent or awful planning depending on your view point but for me it does allow me to put together a themed blog for the first updated of my new website so I’m quite happy with that!

SIII delegation is the legal right for vets to delegate certain protected skills to vet nurses who are on the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons register. They must also be competent and trained and willing to accept the delegation. This is a two-way process that needs to be fully understood but all parties – vet, vet nurse, team and client.

Recently I have written for Vet Record, The Webinar Vets new Gazette and also for Vet Times on this subject and I’m really pleased with the picture its building of what we need to to do with SIII delegation and why.

The RCVS survey of 2017 showed vets and vet nurses didn’t fully understand the process of delegation, but both parties wanted to delegate and accept delegation more, so I’m hoping that in these articles I cover how we can do this, why we should and where we can get some help.

After all #PlanetRVN is only one letter away from #PlanVetRVN

The Webinar Vet Gazette article with links to RCVS case guides is here 

The Vet Record article is free to download as a PDF until the middle of November and is here

Finally the link between EMS, the TP scheme and the AVS all rolled into one and is available here

One last trip…

One last trip…

I have waited to post this blog on here for a while as now it seems real that we are a One Pet family, for the first time in a long time.

Tillie soldiered on to the end ignoring that she had no kidney function left at all and even ate some cat treats when at the vets, but it was to be her final trip to the vets as we didn’t want to wait until she started to show any signs of pain or distress. read more about our journey together here

Working with chronic pain in the vet industry – my experience

Working with chronic pain in the vet industry – my experience

Working in the veterinary industry usually means you need to be pretty fit and physically able. Yet there are many of us out there that live with health conditions that mean we need to practice a lot of good self care.

I shared what I do and have done during my journey living with chronic pain. Read the full blog here

 

SIII survey results confirm the vet nurses role

SIII survey results confirm the vet nurses role

Thanks to the RCVS SIII survey the results are in and what vet nurses do every day across the UK has been confirmed. Those of us in #planetrvn know what we do, but ensuring the team, our employers and the wider public know what we do is hugely important.

These results show that we need to work with vets and our employers to ensure the vet team utilises nurses skills fully. Increasing job satisfaction, career routes and hopefully retention of vet nurses.

Read the original blog here

Unwelcome guests

Unwelcome guests

I’ve always held an admiration for some parasites. They are tiny superheroes whose entire existence is to put in minimal effort to get the maximum out of living off others.

Owning pets means you do need to consider how to prevent them getting parasites and how to treat them if they arrive. In this blog I recall the horror of moving house to find some unwelcome guests who were not paying the mortgage!

Your pet or home having fleas doesn’t mean you are unclean or a bad pet parent… these guys are pretty indestructible check out how I coped read the original blog here

Nursing yourself – the menopause

Nursing yourself – the menopause

Vet nursing is a ‘young profession’ as the average age of a vet nurse is around the early to mid 30’s. This doesn’t mean that members of the profession are all young and career longevity is improving so staying in the profession is easier and more fulfilling.

All this means that inevitable the menopause will hit our industry as we are still a female dominated work force.

I have found some ideas and support for those of us in clinical work and non-clinical work so read the original blog here