First opinion nursing – a focus for further qualifications

First opinion nursing – a focus for further qualifications

 

Earlier this year the RCVS asked for feedback on the proposed changes to the current vet nurse Advanced Diploma – see the news here. The qualification requires re-validation as all qualifications do on a regular basis and this has fallen at a time when VN Futures is looking at career progression and education of vet nurses. 

This has resulted in some possible changes to the qualification including moving the academic level up to a Level 7 qualification and opening up the possibility of shared modules with the vets CertAVP qualification. So far, so good.  

I have already given my feedback to the RCVS through their survey so what I wanted to raise awareness of here was the subject areas that are proposed for the diploma to cover and more specifically one big area that was missing: 

First opinion vet nursing 

We are used to seeing advanced qualifications be based around medical or surgical nursing or ECC or anaesthesia. While all these are worthy CPD routes it strikes me that not everyone may want to become a ‘specialist’ nurse in a specific clinical area and although I have done advanced training in some of these areas myself I consider myself very much a first opinion nurse. A good (I hope!) all-rounder who moves from behavioural first aid in the waiting room to ECC nurse in the prep room and lots in between.  

First opinion, primary or general care whatever title this area is given is sometimes neglected for the specific training needs it has and there are a few facts to support the need to have a ‘general specialist’ qualification for vet nurses: 

 

  • This is where most vet nurses and vets are employed 

 

  • Most cases seen don’t ever need a ‘second opinion’ so a complete care journey is achieved by these practitioners 

 

  • The knowledge held by staff is not ‘general’  

 

  • These practices provide valuable training and support for student vets and nurses 

 

There are also the non-clinical aspects of first opinion vet nursing to consider. It is often the nurses who provide the administrative support to allow a practice to function and this covers everything from pet insurance claims to rotas. There is often a level of financial skill needed in sourcing new products and keeping the practice prices competitive but making a profit. First opinion vet nurses are also key in ensuring great communication between the team and with clients and finally as ever I do believe all vet nurses are leaders. 

With all these necessary skills to master and I’m sure you’re thinking of many more right now could it be time to harness suitable training under a First Opinion specialism? 

Could we see a GP AVN qualification added to the RCVS plans for the Dip AVN and bring together the skills needed – nursing, business, management, customer care communication and leadership? I really hope so as we need to be proud of the quality of first opinion care we provide in the UK and celebrate it.

Delegation for SIII for vet nurses

Delegation for SIII for vet nurses

I’ve somehow managed to have a few pieces on a similar theme out at once, excellent or awful planning depending on your view point but for me it does allow me to put together a themed blog for the first updated of my new website so I’m quite happy with that!

SIII delegation is the legal right for vets to delegate certain protected skills to vet nurses who are on the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons register. They must also be competent and trained and willing to accept the delegation. This is a two-way process that needs to be fully understood but all parties – vet, vet nurse, team and client.

Recently I have written for Vet Record, The Webinar Vets new Gazette and also for Vet Times on this subject and I’m really pleased with the picture its building of what we need to to do with SIII delegation and why.

The RCVS survey of 2017 showed vets and vet nurses didn’t fully understand the process of delegation, but both parties wanted to delegate and accept delegation more, so I’m hoping that in these articles I cover how we can do this, why we should and where we can get some help.

After all #PlanetRVN is only one letter away from #PlanVetRVN

The Webinar Vet Gazette article with links to RCVS case guides is here 

The Vet Record article is free to download as a PDF until the middle of November and is here

Finally the link between EMS, the TP scheme and the AVS all rolled into one and is available here

#planetrvn – ranked in the best vlogs in the world!

#planetrvn – ranked in the best vlogs in the world!

When your inbox is filled with GDPR requests in can make checking emails rather dull, so I was even more pleased than usual to get an email from blogspot to say my YouTube channel is in the Top 75 Veterinary YouTube channels in the world!

In fact its at No 34! How amazing is that!

Thanks to the amazing subscribers and viewers who have made the channel such a success. We’re very close to breaking into the top 30 channels so if anyone else would like an emails roughly every 2 weeks to show you my latest video then please SUBSCRIBE and boost our chart position!

Its hard to believe how low I was feeling when I started recording some videos hoping to help a few students… that was 2 years ago and look where we are now! The student vet nurse community really saved me with their positive feedback – THANK YOU!

 

 

Salary, hours, environment – what matters to you?

Salary, hours, environment – what matters to you?

There is no such thing as ‘standard terms and conditions’ for employment in the veterinary world. The needs of each practice are unique and therefore the employment contract is usually unique too!

For you this provides room to negotiate or select where you work that suits you most. It also means you should consider what means the most to you – hours? salary? discounted care for your pets?

You choose – read more here

 

 

 

#planetrvn says ‘Money Talks’

Recruit4vets get a lot of feedback on what people look for in a job advert, and in the job itself. They supply both permanent and locum positions for vet practices and as we were discussing blog ideas last year we hit upon the idea of getting a poll together to ask what people really had as their top priorities.

Yes, there are salary surveys by many organisations but that’s for the role you are in now… R4V wanted to know what was the biggest, and smallest motivator when looking for a new position and I wanted to prove that talking about money doesn’t hurt, it only helps with the recruitment process.

As we all know mentioning salary or working hours in a job advert seems taboo for many veterinary employers… well let’s see how important that is to you … read more

How do you create Standard Operating Procedures for vet practice?

How do you create Standard Operating Procedures for vet practice?

Good morning,

Hey #planetrvn – You may be having a snow day and seeing fewer patients – maybe you’re going through your huge Vet Nurse To Do List… there’s always things to tweet and improve even in the best of practices. If you’re a vet nurse considering how to write some Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) you might find my latest Recruit4Vets blog helpful.

Stay safe and write an SOP!

Jane

VetFest – al fresco CPD

VetFest – al fresco CPD

 

I admit I thought I was a bit old to be attending a festival. I like my home comforts and spending a couple of days in a field didn’t seem to offer many home comforts. Maybe there has been too much mud on TV from Glastonbury but the appeal of CPD in a field was a little lost on me.

 

When its summer I need to have my toes out at all times. How would I cope with mud? What if it rains, will I cope with a chemical toilet, how would I cope with the crazy festival vibe?

 

Still, I planned for my time in the field. I bought a poncho for the rain, a selfie stick for many photo opportunities and a floral headband so I would fit in, how could I not enjoy myself?

 

Well Dear Reader, enjoy myself I did. Everything about VetFest was fabulous. Although there could have been more face glitter….

 

IMG_1412

 

Let’s start with the important part – the CPD. The lectures were held marquees creating a fab atmosphere.  To counter the noise from neighbouring marquees there were headphones for attendees and it looked like we were in a silent disco.

The subjects were varied and the presentations of a really high standard. I was sorry to not to have been able to go the rehab lectures on the Saturday as they looked amazing. I really enjoyed  Kieran Borgeats cardiology and Jon Bowens behaviour and noise phobia lectures.

The facilities needn’t  have had me worried. The toilets were actually pretty plush. The food was fantastic – the best I’ve had at any CPD. There was also plenty of places to top up your water bottle and the food was served in cardboard containers. It was easy to avoid single use plastics so I was really happy.

The atmosphere was laid back and friendly. The small size of the festival really helped. I had envisioned a huge queue for food and toilets but that wasn’t the case.

A few days before we had received an email about an embargo on broadcasting any of the key note with Russell Brand. It all made it seem pretty serious but I needn’t have worried. The discussion between Russell and Noel was great. Relaxed, fun, but discussing the pressures on the vet industry and what we can do about it. I’m sure I’m not the only one who felt that being in our industry makes us part of a special club that’s an honour to be in it and we need to look after each other.

 

 

This was possibly the friendliest CPD meeting I’ve been to. I had an absolute blast, met so many great people and learnt loads, all while being outside! I’m thinking next year I get a VW Camper van and stay for the weekend! See you there in 2018, when everyone will have their toes out!

 

IMG_1396